Posts Tagged ‘california

20
Dec
11

A Nation of Rosalind Franklins, Rather Than Ben

Another quick note on our educated populace. I recently watched someone try to learn physics on his own. He was assiduous about the learning, and–being availed any number of written, online, and hands-on resources–one would think he quickly became an expert. And yet, after 4 years of trying, he still has a serious misunderstanding of the fundamentals of the science. Is it because he’s unteachable? No. Is it because physics is too difficult to comprehend, even at its basest level? No. Why, then, could he fail to learn it after trying so hard?

What I have noticed in my (admittedly paltry)Look, Ma, lots of hands! year-ish of teaching here in the States is that more and more people have a serious difficulty synthesizing information. While the problem my students have in communicating a hypothesis effectively is understandable (as is their lack of being able to formulate good game plans in general), what I find interesting is their seeming lack of ability to analyze their own results. For example, say a student indirectly measures the height of a table by seeing how long a pencil takes to fall off of it. If one measurement says the table is 4 feet tall, and another says it’s 8, they have a very difficult time understanding what that data means. In truth, they tend to just not think about it. They report it, then move on.

This is a problem I’ve seen reflected in myriad instances in the country. Immediate utility, rather than broad applicability, is what has increasingly become of the focus of a populace ever more terrified and bewildered by the idea of thinking critically about subjects. It seems that the emphasis in everyday problem-solving has become immediate gratification. Maybe it’s the result of the Sesame Street generation growing up. Maybe the further infantilization of the Facebook crowd is adding to it. I tend to think, however, that the problem is one that has historically plagued anyone who is obsessed with linear thought.

Linear thought processes are great. They can help keep ideas organized, can keep ideas focused, and can keep blogs on-track. They are not, however, so great at seeing the forest for the forest. Take the titular case of Rosalind Franklin, for example. While her photograph of DNA’s structure may have been the first, her inability to see it for what it was led to her getting scooped by James Watson on her own data.

Our country has always purported to encourage the Ben Franklins amongst us to greatness. Those who can understand that the electricity coming out of the bulb might be the same as the luminescence visible during a thunderstorm are supposed to always find a home here. More and more, though, this kind of thinking is being seen as suspect and, worse yet, European.At least it's still sunny in December, suckers!

Nowhere is the lack of understanding the causation of the big picture from the little picture more evident (and evidently disastrous) than in California.

California boasts a “direct democracy.” In other words, voters decide on policy. It sounds great, but it’s actually a horrible idea given the lack of ability of the statewide electorate to understand and extrapolate from data. Want better parks? Sure. Better schools? Absolutely. More cops and firemen on the streets? You bet! Want to pay more taxes? No way! And that, in a nutshell, is how a state with a huge economy can go bankrupt.

The basic understanding of how the little picture relates to the big picture is part of what makes a science like physics fun to teach. Look at the pencil fall off the table. That’s also what holds our universe together (and on, and on). It’s also what makes nations work. Looking at the data of our society right now, we can derive the following: we are not recovering from an almost-depression as quickly as we should; we are quickly becoming a nation of the chronically un-and-under-employed; we are coexisting with other first-world markets that are equally hurting; we are trying to mitigate terrorist threats from multiple countries of origin; and we are paying historically little in taxes. After reading this list of problems the next president will need to address, one can easily derive that the next president must be:
1. Highly proactive and persuasive to a bipartisan group
2. A master diplomat
3. Tough-minded and steady
Nate Silver’s work has shown as much. Specifically, it said that, if the economy continues to recover slowly, the GOP candidate is a shoe-in against Obama. Just so long as he’s neither an extremist nor has taken crazily extreme positions.

Here are the GOP candidates:

Nuff said.

Advertisements
01
Jun
09

Who Knew The Terminator Was A Cutter?

Schwarzenneger is in a pickle. Granted. His state is in serious trouble, and has voted not to raise taxes to help alleviate it. And so, confronted with the notion of having a state go bankrupt, he’s making cuts. Got it. And, since federal support is not so much enjoyed by the rich, it’s going to be stuff for the rest of us. Got it.

Salary reductions for state employees are pretty standard, as are, unfortunately, education cuts. They suck, but they’re standard. However…

Mr. Schwarzenegger, a Republican, is threatening to eliminate the Healthy Family Program, the state’s health insurance program that covers over 900,000 children and is financed with state and federal money, as well as the state’s main welfare program, known as Cal-Works, which provides temporary financial assistance to poor families and a caregiver for the severely disabled.

Taking away poor children’s health insurance? Wow. Just…WOW.

Well, at least now we know there’ll never be a Presi-nator, whether or not the Constitutional requirement for nascent citizenship gets amended.

P.S.
Ahnold, watch your back. Hillary’ll get you for this if it’s the last thing she does, especially if Obama’s health care reform goes through and winds up dwarfing her (already small) health care legacy. And, as we all know, that bitch is mean.

27
May
09

Reddit Sums Up My Rage Against The Homophobes In My Home State

How sad when Reddit’s tiny alien sums up my mood.

reddit

In any case, the bullshit that is Prop. 8 was upheld. On the one hand, I think it’s a shitty ruling, since the CA Supreme Court had previously declared the ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional. On the other, negating something voted into law would have to entail election shenanigans, I would assume, and there were none here. Just bigotry. Of course, why this bigotry is not being called out and decried by the courts that called out and decried the bigotry directed at interracial couples is…well, bullshit. Total fucking bullshit. And no one can talk me down, to use the parlance of someone now designated a third-class system by the very justice system that is supposed to defend her rights as a citizen and a person.

In any case, I still seriously and fully support Melissa Etheridge’s idea of a tax boycott. Taxation without representation is unamerican (just ask Washington D.C.), and shouldn’t be tolerated. If a substantial percentage of the population has to wait till 2010 for their civil rights to maybe be granted by the state in which they reside, that state should have to wait till 2010 to see if maybe they pay their taxes.